How gospel communities are different to some things that look similar

This is a re-posting. The original version of this video was not working so I have reloaded it.

In this clip I try to explain how our vision in Total Church and The Crowded House is different from some approaches that look similar. While not wanting to exaggerate the differences, I try to explain how our vision contrasts with that of reconstructionists who try to reproduce exactly what was happening the New Testament and pragmatists who are driven by sociological or business models. The key is biblical theology.

This video clip is from the 2010 Total Church Conference in Sheffield, UK. The full conference media are available here.

9 thoughts on “How gospel communities are different to some things that look similar

  1. “I try to explain how our vision contrasts with that of reconstructionists who try to reproduce exactly what was happening the New Testament and pragmatists who are driven by sociological or business models.” All I can say is: Right On!

  2. I thought there was something wrong with it too, but Tim is here in Perth at the moment, and when we put the same question to him he said much the same thing. :)

  3. Rory – he says he’s a Dalek?

    Actually, I do have a question. My brother is trying to bamboozle me with logic as he’s been taking Bible classes and seems to think that arguing with me will get me to go back to church. He keeps talking about how he’s “working through” the question of whether Corinthians means that women should wear head-coverings at all times. So – I don’t know if I can put this as a question, so I’ll just waffle for a second. (a) isn’t this culturally specific? there’s a lot of “the women of the day” and “in Paul’s experience” mentioned in the blurb he sent me. His response to that question was “if it’s true, it’s all true. If it’s not all true, none of it’s true.” Now… that seems overly simplistic to me. Parables specific to the culture and environment of the Middle East don’t translate to Papua New Guinea, for example – there are no camels in PNG, or fig trees, or mustard seeds, etc. (b) is this actually an issue in the modern church? Do people really spend time agonising over whether their wives should have long hair (worn up) AND be wearing headscarves? As well as muttering about scarves, my sister’s ex-fiance told her she couldn’t borrow his jumper on a cold night because then she would be wearing men’s clothes. Thankfully she broke up with him, or I suspect I’d be communicating with her via hand-written letter delivered a-horseback into their secluded country home where she wore the Christian equivalent of a burqa.

    Personally, I think that this is really a non-issue, in the overall scheme of things. It’s DEFINITELY not making me want to go back to church.

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